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Best Mac webcams

During the pandemic millions of people around the world were reliant on video apps such as Zoom or Apple’s own FaceTime to chat with family and friends online, the pandemic may be past its worse, but video calling still remains popular. And, of course, many of us are still working from home the majority of the time, continuing to use business-oriented apps such as Skype or Microsoft Teams to set up video calls with colleagues and clients. Apart from the Mac mini and Mac Pro, all Macs have one of Apple’s FaceTime cameras already built in, so you don’t necessarily need to buy a new webcam for video calls. However, the webcams on many Macs offer embarrassingly low resolution. As an alternative you can use your iPhone as a Mac webcam, and Apple is improving this functionality in iOS 16 and macOS Ventura, Business users in particular will want to pick something better in order to project a more professional image to colleagues and clients, while many artists and musicians vlog and promote their work on TikTok, Instagram and YouTube. Almost all Mac owners could benefit from upgrading to something that can provide a sharper image than their machine’s default camera. With that in mind, here’s our guide to some of the best webcams for use with your Mac, complete with links to buy. For broader advice, jump down to our thoughts on what to look for in a Mac webcam. 1. Kensington W1050 – Excellent and affordable Pros Very affordable 1080p resolution Good Mac app Cons USB-A interface Mac app requires macOS 10.15.4 or later (but app not required to work with Macs Kensington makes a variety of webcams and other accessories for video-conferencing, but its new W1050 is very competitively priced, and arrives just as Kensington releases a new Mac interpretación of its Konnect app as well. With a price of just $49.99/£34.99, the W1050 is one of the most affordable 1080p (1920×1080) webcams we’ve seen so far. It doesn’t cut many corners, though, providing a bright sharp image that is clearer and more detailed than the 720p FaceTime camera on my aging office iMac. It provides 95-degree viewing angle, with fixed-focus to ensure that the entire image remains in focus at all times (which is handy if you need to move around during a presentation). The adjustable stand can rest on your desk or attach to your computer screen, and allows you to tilt and rotate the camera to get the right viewing angle. It includes twin microphones with noise-cancelling features to reduce background noise, and there’s a privacy shutter on the front of the camera too. The only thing to watch out for is that the W1050 uses an older USB-A interface – which is fine for my old iMac, but you’ll need an adaptor for newer Macs that only have USB-C. Like any USB webcam, the W1050 works automatically with Macs when connected camino USB, but you will need Catalina (10.15.4) or later if you also want to use Kensington’s Konnect app. This provides additional controls for adjusting brightness, contrast and other settings, but its most useful feature is the ability to create and save profiles with settings that are suitable for different locations or lighting conditions. And, if you’re really serious about setting up a studio for video calls, conferencing or podcasting, then Kensington also has a range of accessories for use with its webcams, such as ring lights, and extendable mounts and stands. 2. Logitech Brio 500 Pros Tilt and swivel magnetic stand  Clear, sharp 1080p resolution  Show Mode for collaboration Cons Expensive for 1080p camera Logitech’s Brio range of webcams has been very popular in recent years – with the Brio Ultra HD Pro currently being our favourite 4K webcam – and it has just launched a new range of Brio cameras, starting with the Brio 500. Priced at £129.00/$129.99 and available in a variety of colours, the Brio 500 looks like a fairly conventional webcam, with a USB-C interface that allows it to work automatically with any Mac or PC that also has USB-C. However, this new model includes a number of new features that make it more versatile than many of its rivals, and will particularly appeal to people who need to make conference calls when working from home. The camera itself is fairly straightforward, with a high-quality glass lens that is capable of recording 1080p video at 30 frames per second, along with a privacy shutter and noise-cancelling microphone. The camera provides 65° – 90° field of view, but it also includes a new stand with an adjustable magnetic clip that allows you to freely rotate the camera to any angle you want. And, when used with the Logi Tune app – available for macOS 10.15 or later – you can use the new Show Mode to tilt the camera so that it points down at your desk and then automatically inverts the image so that you can show other people the documents or designs that you’re working on. 3. Razer Kiyo – Best Features on a 1080p Webcam Pros Light ring Long USB cable Good value Cons Razer's synapse app isn't Mac-compatible, but the software isn't really necessary Best Prices Today: €65.99 at amazon.de | €65.99 at coolblue | €72.90 at check24.de Elektronik Razer is best known for its range of gaming gear, and the Kiyo webcam is primarily aimed at gamers who need a high-quality camera for Twitch streaming and e-sports. It’s a shame that Razer’s Synapse app isn’t Mac-compatible, but the Kiyo itself still works as a standard USB-webcam without needing any additional software, and has a number of other useful features that will come in handy for video chats with friends and even for business calls. The Kiyo provides a nice sharp 1080p lens (1920×1080), with 81.6 degrees viewing angle, and can record video at 30fps, or capture still images at 2688×1520. The adjustable stand can clip to the top of a computer screen or fold flat to sit on your desk. You can tilt the camera lens to get just the right viewing angle, and the Kiyo’s USB cable is 1.5m long so that you can adjust the position freely. There’s also a tripod mount on the base of the stand as well – although you have to use your own tripod. Like many webcams, the Kiyo has an autofocus function so it can keep your picture nice and clear when you’re moving around, but the main feature that sets it apart is its built-in ‘lighting ring’. The andar outer rim that surrounds the camera lens lights up as soon as you select the Kiyo as a video source in your video apps, and you can turn the ring like a dial to adjust the brightness level up or down. That can help solve the gloomy image quality that many of us struggle with when making video calls from a bedroom or makeshift office at home. Razer also makes a good range of high-quality microphones that work well with the Kiyo too. 4. Logitech Brio – Best 4K webcam Pros Supports HDR Supports 1080p video at 60fps Three field-of-view options Cons High price Best Prices Today: $199.99 at Best Buy | $199.99 at Dell Home | $199.99 at Dell Small Business Logitech probably has the widest range of webcams currently available, ranging from low-cost models for video chats with your friends to gaming cameras and even full-blown videoconferencing systems for business users. The Brio is one of the company’s top-of-the-range models – in fact, Logitech claims it’s “our best webcam ever”. It’s not cheap, costing £199/$199, but earns its keep with a high-quality lens that offers full 4K resolution (4096×2160) at 30fps, or standard 1080p video (1920×1080) at 60fps (although, of course, you’ll need pretty fast broadband to handle 4K streaming). The Brio also supports HDR – high dynamic range – for bright, bold colours, and Logitech’s RightLight technology, which automatically adjusts the image to cope with changing light levels during the day. The Brio is versatile, too, offering three field-of-view settings: a narrow 65 degrees for close-up head-and-shoulders shots, or you can widen the view to 78 degrees or 90 degrees to capture a wider view of the room and other people. The camera also includes two microphones, with noise-cancellation features to improve audio quality. The adjustable stand can clip on to the top of your computer screen, or be mounted on a tripod for more professional productions (although you do have to supply your own tripod). There’s a privacy shade to cover the camera for extra security. The Brio works as a standard USB camera, so you can quickly plug it in and use it on your Mac with apps such as FaceTime or Zoom, but Logitech also provides a Mac interpretación of its Settings app, to provide extra controls. 5. Ausdom AW651 – Best for Streamers + VLoggers Pros Supports HDR Supports 2K at 30fps and 1080p at 60fps Tripod included Cons No software provided Ausdom’s AW651 – sometimes also referred to as the ‘HDR 2K’ – is an affordable option for people who want more than a standard 1080p webcam, but perhaps don’t want to spend a lot of money on an expensive 4K model. Priced at a competitive $89.99/£69.99, the AW651 provides two main options, allowing you to stream 2K video (2560 x 1440) at 30 frames per second, or 1080p (1920 x 1080) at a super-smooth 60fps. It supports HDR, with auto-focus and a viewing angle of 75-degrees, and the camera head can tilt and rotate to help you get the right angle for your video calls. The only disadvantage here is that Ausdom doesn’t provide any software for the camera at all – either for Mac or Windows. There is a button on the back of the camera that lets you adjust the frame rate, but you’ll have to rely on FaceTime, Zoom or other streaming apps to control resolution and other settings. The AW651 will work with any Mac running macOS 10.6 or above, but it uses a USB-A cable to connect to your Mac, so owners of Macs that only have USB-C will need an adaptor. However, the AW651 worked fine with our office iMac (USB-A) and with our USB-C MacBook Air with an adaptor. There’s a privacy shutter built into the camera, and the adjustable stand can sit on the desk, or be attached to your computer screen or a tripod. And, surprisingly for such an affordable camera, the AW651 even includes a small six-inch tripod as well, making it good value for streamers and vloggers who need to adjust the camera position from time to time. 6. Razer Kiyo Pro – Best for 60FPS Streaming and Broadcasting Pros 60fps recording Gorilla Glass lens and lens cover Cons Software is PC only, so Mac users miss some features Lacks the lighting ring of the cheaper model Best Prices Today: $99.99 at Microsoft Razer’s Kiyo webcam made a big impression when it was first launched a few years ago, thanks to its 1080 resolution and the built-in lighting ring that helped to improve image quality for video calls and streaming. Somewhat oddly, the Kiyo Pro no longer has that lighting ring, and it sticks with 1080p resolution, yet it’s twice as expensive, costing $199.99/£199.99 compared to $99.99/£99.99 for its predecessor (which is still on sale). That’s because the Kiyo Pro steps up to a USB 3.0 interface, which allows it to record higher frame rates of up to 60fps at 1080p resolution. The high-quality camera lens also supports HDR – although HDR is only available when recording at 30fps – and performs better in low light conditions, providing better all-round image quality and colour balanceo. The Kiyo Pro also has an adjustable stand that can sit on your desk, or be attached to a computer screen or tripod (not included). The camera cable connects to a USB-A port on your computer – so you’ll need an adaptor for Macs that only have USB-C – but it’s 1.5m long, so you can move the camera around freely in order to get it into the right position. The camera lens is coated with tough Gorilla Glass for extra durability, and there’s a lens cover included as well, to protect the webcam if you need to carry it with you when you’re travelling. Unfortunately, Razer’s Synapse software is only available for Windows PCs, so Mac users miss out on some of its more advanced features, such as the ability to adjust the field of view. However, the Kiyo Pro still works perfectly well as a straightforward plug-n-play USB camera with Macs. FaceTime and Zoom on my MacBook Air detected the Kiyo Pro automatically as soon as I plugged it in, and it provided a much sharper and more colourful image than the MacBook’s ageing 720p FaceTime camera. 7. Hypercam HD – Best Budget Webcam Pros Low cost Records in a 1080p 78-degree field of view Cons equivalente to a few Chinese-made webcams, but we didn't encounter any problems The Hypercam HD is inexpensive while offering a high-spec range of features, making it one of the best value webcams here. Its 1080p HD resolution picture quality is noticeably better than the Mac’s default 720p HD camera, and the audio is clear. The Hypercam’s glass lens has a 78-degree field of view – the same as the top-end Logitech C922. It also matches that webcam with fast 720p HD at 60Hz, and 1080p at 30fps. The Hypercam features built-in HD autofocus and light correction, and two integrated mics. It is adjustable at up to 170 degrees. Installation is simple – just plug the USB cable into your computer or docking station, and the driver automatically installs for almost immediate use. Unfortunately there’s no tripod mount option, but you can hang it off your display, or place it on a desktop. We were initially concerned that it looked eerily equivalente to a few other Chinese-made webcams – and it’s not badged as a Hyper product – but we found few faults in testing. 8. AverMedia Live Streamer Cam 513 – Best 4K webcam Pros 1080p at 60fps 94-degree field of view Cons Faint ticking noise coming from the webcam Best Prices Today: $149.99 at Best Buy | Not Available at Lenovo The AverMedia Cam 513 stands out because it offers Sony’s 8MP Exmore R CMOS image sensor for 4K at 30fps or 1080p at 60fps video capture. There’s also an impressive 94-degree field of view, which provides the user with a large canvas for cropping and zooming without noticeable loss in detail. That’s where the AverMedia CamEngine comes in. CamEngine is a vital utility and essentially required to get the most out of the Cam 513 – which doesn’t have drivers, you need to use their software. The software allows you to tweak the image using advanced features such as Snapchat-style filters and AI-powered camera cropping. Regarding those AI-related capabilities, it can crop in and track your face as you move around – good news if you move around a lot while on video calls. It’s not always flawless in performance however – we found it sometimes cropped into something that vaguely looked like a face, but you’ve also got the option of manually setting up each crop for different shots and angles. Shots can be programmed to hotkeys, allowing for extreme zooms and dramatic ultra-wide shots on-the-fly during streams and video calls. You’ll also find a privacy-focused shutter built in which will cover the webcam sensor when not in use. The adjustable stand will attach to most displays. The camera plugs into your Mac camino USB-C – the cable isn’t built-in but we don’t think that is a disadvantage (it means you can replace it with a shorter or longer USB-C cable depending on how you want to set it up.) It’s a great 4K webcam – the only real annoyance is that we could hear a faint ticking noise coming from the webcam during use. What to look for in a Mac webcam We’ve picked out five webcams worthy of recommendation above, but here’s some more general advice on what to look for. Resolution The FaceTime cameras included on all MacBook laptops and most iMac models are limited to just ‘720p’ – which generally means a resolution of 1280×720 (although the FaceTime camera on my office iMac only seems to record at 1080×720). That’s pretty basic in these days of HD and 4K video, so in recent months many people have decided to upgrade to a higher-quality webcam that supports HD resolution of 1920×1080, or even one of the latest 4K webcams. Useful features As well as providing a sharper, high-resolution video image, other useful features to look out for when buying a new webcam include autofocus, which can keep the image clear and sharp even if you need to move around a little, and brightness adjustment for when gloomier days. A wide-angle lens can be useful too, allowing you to fit more than one person into the image, or allowing business users to step back from the camera while giving a presentation or using a whiteboard. Framerates You should also check to make sure that the webcam can record smooth video with a framerate of 25 or 30 frames per second (fps). Some webcams can even record at 60fps, although that’s mainly for specialist tasks such as gaming and e-sports on Twitch. Connection standards There’s certainly plenty of choice these days, and most modern webcams will work with your Mac automatically as they just use a standard USB connection – generally USB 3.0, although USB-C is now starting to appear on some new webcams too. Once it’s plugged in, a USB webcam should then be able to work with any suitable video software on your Mac, such as FaceTime, Zoom or Skype (although it’s a shame that Apple never got around to releasing a Windows interpretación of FaceTime, as that puts it at a real disadvantage against its video-chat rivals). The webcam’s microphone will also appear as an audio input in the Sounds control letrero in System Preferences on your Mac. Apps Some manufacturers also provide their own apps with their webcams, which can help with features such as brightness and autofocus, so it’s worth checking to see if the webcam provides its own Mac app as well. Computer Accessories, Mac

iPhone 14 review: Is good enough good enough?

At a glanceExpert's Rating ProsAction Mode is brilliantFaster low light shots so you don’t have to hold the iPhone still for as longConsPrice increase in many parts of the worldNo Dynamic Island or always-on displayFew changes as compared to the now cheaper iPhone 13Our VerdictThe iPhone 14 has enough new features to make it an excellent choice if you are looking to upgrade from an older iPhone. While it’s not a huge leap up from the previous model, the new camera features will be enough to make iPhone 13 users jealous. Best Prices Today: Apple iPhone 14 128 GB mitternacht Retailer Price €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €999.00 View Deal €1069.00 View Deal Price comparison from over 24,000 stores worldwide View more prices The iPhone 14 is basically an iPhone 13s. It features a very similar processor and has a very similar appearance as the previous generation, but like the S iPhones of old offers a bunch of new camera features that improve photography in impressive ways. Starting at $799, the iPhone 14 costs the same as the iPhone 13 in the U.S.—though if you live elsewhere you will be paying more. In the U.K. for example the iPhone 14 costs £849 while the iPhone 13 was £779. This bump in price means the standard iPhone is less affordable than it was for many, and when you consider you could save $100/£100 by buying a new iPhone 13, the question is: Do the new features justify the price? What’s new (and what’s the same) With the arrival of the iPhone 14, Apple has increased the gap between the standard and Pro iPhones. This year nearly all the headline features are absent from the iPhone 14. This doesn’t mean that the iPhone 14 isn’t a good choice, it just means that you’re sacrificing more by going with the lower model. One thing you won’t be sacrificing is the notch. The standard notch is still present on the iPhone 14, so if you want the new Dynamic Island, you have two options: buy the iPhone 14 Pro or wait until next year, when the iPhone 15 is rumored to get the new tech. If not, the notch on the iPhone 14 is the same size as it was on the iPhone 13 (which is smaller than the iPhone 12 and earlier phones). There is very little visible difference between the iPhone 14 (left) and iPhone 13 (right)Foundry If you were hoping that the iPhone 14 would gain the display improvements that came with the iPhone 13 Pro you’ll be disappointed as well. ProMotion arrived on the iPhone 13 Pro but it’s still not a feature of the iPhone 14. Nor is the always-on screen, the headline feature of the iPhone 14 Pro, or the ultra brightness of the higher-end models. Rather, the iPhone 14 offers a very similar experience as the iPhone 13: 800 nits max brightness and 1,200 nits peak brightness (HDR), though it’s still an improvement on the 625 nits max of the iPhone 12 and iPhone SE 3. So what new features does the iPhone 14 get? Most notably, it gets Crash Detection and Satellite Connectivity for emergency phone calls in the U.S. and vega. Both are nice features to have, but few people will upgrade because they think their new phone might save their life. Still we’ll no doubt see these features in the September 2023 iPhone keynote in Apple’s “look at these lives we saved” segment. There are some new color options to set the iPhone 14 apart from the iPhone 13. The iPhone 14 offers pale blue, light purple, Midnight (black), Starlight (silver), and Product Red, while the iPhone 13 comes in green, pink and dark blue, as well as Midnight, Starlight and Product Red. You’ll probably put a case on it anyway but be careful which one you buy—Apple has slightly shifted the location and size of the power and volume buttons so old cases probably won’t fit. If you lie the iPhone 14 on a surface you will notice just how much the cameras protrude,Foundry Camera action The best way to tell the iPhone 13 and iPhone 14 apart is by laying them on their back. You’ll clearly see that the cameras on the back of the newer iPhone cause the phone to be raised more—and for a good reason. The iPhone 14 still features two cameras array with 12MP wide and ultra-wide lenses, but for this generation Apple includes a faster aperture (ƒ/1.5 rather than ƒ/1.6) and a larger sensor and larger 1.9μm pixels on the main camera. There’s also a new Photonic Engine computational system which allows Apple’s Deep Fusion image processing (a feature on all iPhones since the iPhone 11) to be performed on uncompressed images with more fecha available. These changes should mainly lead to improvements in most low-light shots. Indeed, Apple claims 49 percent better performance in such conditions. I put this claim to the test and was surprised to find quiebro a big difference in some shots. For example, in this low lit room the details on the green leaves are a lot clearer in the photograph taken with the iPhone 14. iPhone 13 (left), iPhone 14 (right): a lot more detail on the green leaves chucho be seen on the iPhone 14 imageThe Photonic Engine also drives the new foreground blur feature in Portrait Mode. This means that it’s not just the background that will blur when you are taking a Portrait Mode shot (whether from the front or rear cameras). It will also blur what’s directly in front of you, which has the effect of focusing even more attention on the face. We attempted to create this effect, but didn’t feel that our efforts were as good as those in the images taken by Apple’s professional photographer. Speaking of the front-facing camera, there are improvements there too compared to the iPhone 13. The TrueDepth camera now gains autofocus and improved low-light performance thanks to a wider aperture (now ƒ/1.9 rather than ƒ/2.2 aperture). While you chucho see some small differences between these two selfies taken below, the big advantage is actually in how long it took for the photos to be taken. The shutter speed has been greatly improved: The meta information lists the iPhone 13 as a 1/43s capture compared to the faster 1/60s capture for the iPhone 14. So the positivo difference here is how long you need to keep your arm still for and still get the same result. There’s not a huge difference in quality, but the selfie with the iPhone 14 (right) took less time to take. The best reason to upgrade to the iPhone, however, isn’t photos—it’s discos. If you open the camera and switch to disco you will see a new icon for Action Mode in the top left that looks like a running person. Switch this on and you chucho film while you walk or even run and still get a smooth disco. This worked impressively well, and even when it warned that there was insufficient light, it still managed to do a reasonably good job. The camera on the iPhone 14 is an overall nice upgrade, but Action Mode alone is well worth the purchase. Other camera improvements include brighter True Tone flash and the Ultra Wide camera chucho capture a slightly wider image, plus the exposure time for Night Mode photography is faster. Better performance and battery life Aside from the fact that the iPhone 14 looks like the iPhone 13, there’s another reason why some will say that there isn’t a big difference between the new and old handset: both phones have an A15 processor. However, the A15 found in the iPhone 14 isn’t exactly the same as that in the iPhone 13. The iPhone 14 uses the A15 Bionic that Apple used in the iPhone 13 Pro. It has one more GPU core than the standard A15 chip. Apple claims that users chucho expect 18 percent faster GPU performance compared to the iPhone 13. This extra GPU core will be beneficial if you play games or use other graphics intensive apps. There’s not just an extra GPU core on offer here though. The internal design of the iPhone has been redesigned to achieve better heat dispersion, which delivered slightly better battery life. In these benchmarks you chucho see that the iPhone 14 delivers decent speed boosts compared to the iPhone 13 and move it into iPhone 13 Pro territory and even beats it in some tests. One of the big changes for the U.S. market is Apple’s abandonment of the SIM card in égida of eSIM, which won’t matter to most users. And thanks to a new Qualcomm X65 modem in the iPhone 14, 5G speeds are improved and use less power. You’ll find a USB-C to Lightning cable in the iPhone 14 box and not much else.Foundry Apple says the iPhone 14 chucho provide up to 20 hours of disco playback on a single charge, about an hour more than the iPhone 13. It’s not as good as the 23 hours claimed for the iPhone 13 Pro, and it’s well below the estimates for the iPhone 14 Pro Max and iPhone 14 Plus. In our tests, those scores matched up. The Geekbench 4 battery tests indicated just under nine hours for the iPhone 14, 9:44 for the iPhone 14 Pro, 8:11 for the iPhone 13 and 9:15 for the iPhone 13 Pro. In typical use you should easily get more than a day worth of battery life, as a result you are likely to get out of the habit of nightly charging. Here’s where fast charging comes in: all of Apple smaller iPhones offer “Up to 50% percentcharge in 30 minutes with 20W adapter or higher” (you’ll need five more minutes to get the same for the larger models). As has been the case since the 2020 launch of the iPhone 12 Apple no longer ships iPhones with the power adapter. You’ll find a lightning cable in the box but if you don’t already own a plug you’ll need to purchase one. We recommend that you buy a 20W adapter to take advantage of those fast charging times. Should you buy an iPhone 14? Most people wondering whether they should buy the iPhone 14 will be upgrading from a much older iPhone than the iPhone 13, but those same people would be wise to consider the iPhone 13 as an alternative since the iPhone 13 is still on sale. Aside from Action Mode and the other camera improvements there isn’t a big difference between the iPhone 13 and iPhone 14, so if those features don’t appeal you’ll be just as happy with the cheaper iPhone 13. If the new camera features of the iPhone 14 are attractive to you then you may want to consider spending a little more to get the iPhone 14 Pro, which brings a 48MP camera and a 3X telephoto lens along with all of the new iPhone 14 camera features. Plus you’ll get an A16 processor, always-on display and the Dynamic Island. Those features might be worth an extra $200/£250 to you. If you are upgrading from a large iPhone, like the iPhone XS Max or the iPhone 12 Pro, for example, then we’d suggest that you wait until the iPhone 14 Plus arrives in October before buying the iPhone 14 as it will feel smaller in your hands in comparison to what you are used to. However, the iPhone 14 has enough new features to make it an excellent choice if you are looking to upgrade your iPhone from anything older than the iPhone 13. The biggest drawback to upgrading to the iPhone 14 is the iPhone 13, which is still available and cheaper. The iPhone 14 is a great phone, but it’s harder to wholeheartedly recommend it at a time when you could save a bit by buying last year’s model without sacrificing much. For more help with your choice see our reviews of the other 2022 iPhones, our Best iPhone chart and our iPhone buying guide. iPhone 14 Pro Max reviewiPhone 14 Pro review iPhone

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El paso del huracán Ian en Florida: “Aprendimos la lección, la próxima ocasión hay que irse”

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‘Blonde’: Así se hizo la sensacionalista transformación de Ana de Armas en Marilyn Monroe

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Every macOS and Mac OS X version–including the latest update

Wondering what the name of the latest macOS version is? Curious about the versions of Mac OS X that came before? Here we’ll fill you in on the names of the different versions of the Mac operating system in order: from the newest macOS to the first version of Mac OS X and the codenames that Apple used for them. We’ll also show you how you can check which version of macOS you are running and find out what the latest version of macOS is.

If you are wondering what the latest version of macOS is it’s Monterey! Also known as macOS 12. Monterey arrived on Monday, October 25, 2021. For more information read: Everything you need to know about macOS Monterey.

However, Monterey won’t be the newest version of macOS for long. Apple unveiled its plans for the next version of macOS at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) on June 6, 2022. At the keynote that kicked off the WWDC conference Apple revealed details of macOS 13 regalo. The final version will then be available to download in the fall (usually in the September or October time frame).

If you are looking for help installing Monterey read: How to update macOS: Update to Monterey and Fixes for Macs that won’t update macOS. If you want to install the beta of macOS regalo read about joining Apple’s beta program.

History of macOS

Mac OS X first launched more than twenty one years ago on 24 March 2001. There’s been a lot of change over those two decades: good and bad. From the problems with the first edition (it was slow and didn’t run important apps like Microsoft Word) Mac OS X has evolved through various iterations and various designs to what we know today. We’ve seen tight integration with iOS devices, the incorporation of the cloud, and the arrival of excellent and helpful features including integrated Time Machine back ups, Quick Look – which lets you see a preview of a document without opening the application, and innovations like Expose and Spaces and Desktop Stacks to help you work efficiently.

For an overview of the features of the various versions of the Mac operating system, showing how it has developed over time, take a look at our video above. If you want to know the names Apple assigned to Mac OS X over the years, and the codenames that were used internally, read on.

List of macOS version names

Here’s an overview of every version of macOS and Mac OS X Apple has released. You’ll find a complete list of the latest release of each version of OS X and macOS, along version code names, along with internal code names (if available):

OS X 10 beta: Kodiak – September 13, 2000OS X 10.0: Cheetah – March 14, 2001 (Latest: 10.0.4)OS X 10.1: Puma – September 15, 2001 (Latest: 10.1.5)OS X 10.2: Jaguar – August 14, 2002 (Latest: 10.2.8)OS X 10.3 Panther (Pinot) – October 24, 2003 (Latest: 10.3.9)OS X 10.4 Tiger (Merlot) – April 29, 2005 (Latest: 10.4.11)OS X 10.4.4 Tiger (Chardonnay) – January 10, 2006 (for Intel Macs) (Latest: 10.4.11)OS X 10.5 Leopard (Chablis) – October 26, 2007 (Latest: 10.5.8)OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard – August 28, 2009 (Latest: 10.6.8)OS X 10.7 Lion (Barolo) – July 20, 2011 (Latest: 10.7.5)OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion (Zinfandel) – July 25, 2012 (Latest: 10.8.5)OS X 10.9 Mavericks (Cabernet) – October 22, 2013 (Latest: 10.9.5)OS X 10.10: Yosemite (Syrah) – October 16, 2014 (Latest: 10.10.5)OS X 10.11: El Capitan (Gala) – September 30, 2015 (Latest: 10.11.6)macOS 10.12: Sierra (Fuji) – September 20, 2016 (Latest: 10.12.6)macOS 10.13: High Sierra (Lobo) – September 25, 2017 (Latest: 10.13.6)macOS 10.14: Mojave (Liberty) – September 24, 2018 (Latest: 10.14.6)macOS 10.15: Catalina (Jazz) – October 7, 2019 (Latest: 10.15.7, Security Update 2022-005)macOS 11: Big Sur (GoldenGate) – November 12, 2020 (Latest: 11.6.8)macOS 12: Monterey (Star) – October 25, 2021 (Latest: 12.5.1)macOS 13: regalo – Coming fall 2022

We have a full list of which Macs run which versions of Mac OS X and macOS here.

Mac OS X & macOS names

As you can see from the list above, with the exception of the first OS X beta, all versions of the Mac operating system from 2001 to 2012 were all named after big cats, from Cheetah to Panther to Mountain Lion.

But while the public-facing builds were named after big cats, internally, they were named after wines (aside from OS X 10.6 which had no codename).

Even after Apple switched public-facing code names to places in California back in 2013, it carried on naming them after wines internally until 2014. In 2015, Apple decided to change the theme of internal code names from wines to types of apples. Original.

In 2016, Apple took the plunge to unify the branding of its operating systems by rebranding Mac OS X to macOS, which sits nicely alongside iOS, tvOS, and watchOS, and paved the way for macOS 11, the successor to Mac OS X, which arrived twenty years after the first beta of Mac OS X.

Which versions of macOS are still updated?

Apple still supplies regular features and security updates to the most recent version of macOS, Monterey, also known as macOS 12. The latest version of Monterey is macOS 12.5.1 and was released on August 17, 2022)

The previous two versions of macOS also receive security updates and bug fixes. The latest version of Big Sur is macOS 11.6.8 (released on July 20, 2022), and macOS Catalina 10.15.7 Security Update 2022-005, released on July 20, 2022. An update to Safari (15.6.1) was pushed to users of Big Sur and Catalina in August 2022.

How to tell which macOS version you are running

You can tell which version of macOS you are running by clicking on the Apple logo in the top left and choosing About This Mac. It will clearly show which version of macOS you are running along with the most recent version that your Mac has installed

It’s easy to find out which version of macOS is running on a Mac.

Foundry

How to install the latest version of macOS

If you want to update your Mac to a newer version of macOS the method will be determined by the version of macOS you are running.

Very old versions of Mac OS X came on a disk and any security updates came via Software Update. Since the arrival of the Mac App Store in 2011 (as an update to Snow Leopard) versions of Mac OS X and macOS have been available to download via the Mac App Store.

However, that changed slightly with Mojave, which arrived in 2018. Now operating system updates come in via a new Software Updates pane in System Preferences. You can still find the software in the Mac App Store, but you will also see it in System Preferences > Software Update. One of the benefits of this is that your Mac can be set to automatically download the latest updates and install them, keeping your Mac up-to-date with minimum effort on your part.

You can get to System Preferences from the Apple menu: Click on the Apple logo in the top left and choose System Preferences. You may be taken straight to the Software Update pane, if not click on the Software Update cog icon. Your Mac will search for an update and if there is one you can choose Update Now.

Some Macs will be set to update macOS automatically. If you want your Mac to update automatically follow these steps:

In Monterey, Big Sur, Mojave, or Catalina:

Open System Preferences.Click on Software Update.Check the box beside Download new updates when available.Now select the box Install macOS updates.

In High Sierra or earlier:

Open System Preferences.Click on App Store.Check the box beside Automatically check for updates – it should have a tick in it as should the four options below that…Now deselect the box beside Download newly available updates in the background.

Read all about how to update your Mac here.

Mac, MacOS, Personal Software