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Best Mac webcams

During the pandemic millions of people around the world were reliant on video apps such as Zoom or Apple’s own FaceTime to chat with family and friends online, the pandemic may be past its worse, but video calling still remains popular. And, of course, many of us are still working from home the majority of the time, continuing to use business-oriented apps such as Skype or Microsoft Teams to set up video calls with colleagues and clients. Apart from the Mac mini and Mac Pro, all Macs have one of Apple’s FaceTime cameras already built in, so you don’t necessarily need to buy a new webcam for video calls. However, the webcams on many Macs offer embarrassingly low resolution. As an alternative you can use your iPhone as a Mac webcam, and Apple is improving this functionality in iOS 16 and macOS Ventura, Business users in particular will want to pick something better in order to project a more professional image to colleagues and clients, while many artists and musicians vlog and promote their work on TikTok, Instagram and YouTube. Almost all Mac owners could benefit from upgrading to something that can provide a sharper image than their machine’s default camera. With that in mind, here’s our guide to some of the best webcams for use with your Mac, complete with links to buy. For broader advice, jump down to our thoughts on what to look for in a Mac webcam. 1. Kensington W1050 – Excellent and affordable Pros Very affordable 1080p resolution Good Mac app Cons USB-A interface Mac app requires macOS 10.15.4 or later (but app not required to work with Macs Kensington makes a variety of webcams and other accessories for video-conferencing, but its new W1050 is very competitively priced, and arrives just as Kensington releases a new Mac interpretación of its Konnect app as well. With a price of just $49.99/£34.99, the W1050 is one of the most affordable 1080p (1920×1080) webcams we’ve seen so far. It doesn’t cut many corners, though, providing a bright sharp image that is clearer and more detailed than the 720p FaceTime camera on my aging office iMac. It provides 95-degree viewing angle, with fixed-focus to ensure that the entire image remains in focus at all times (which is handy if you need to move around during a presentation). The adjustable stand can rest on your desk or attach to your computer screen, and allows you to tilt and rotate the camera to get the right viewing angle. It includes twin microphones with noise-cancelling features to reduce background noise, and there’s a privacy shutter on the front of the camera too. The only thing to watch out for is that the W1050 uses an older USB-A interface – which is fine for my old iMac, but you’ll need an adaptor for newer Macs that only have USB-C. Like any USB webcam, the W1050 works automatically with Macs when connected camino USB, but you will need Catalina (10.15.4) or later if you also want to use Kensington’s Konnect app. This provides additional controls for adjusting brightness, contrast and other settings, but its most useful feature is the ability to create and save profiles with settings that are suitable for different locations or lighting conditions. And, if you’re really serious about setting up a studio for video calls, conferencing or podcasting, then Kensington also has a range of accessories for use with its webcams, such as ring lights, and extendable mounts and stands. 2. Logitech Brio 500 Pros Tilt and swivel magnetic stand  Clear, sharp 1080p resolution  Show Mode for collaboration Cons Expensive for 1080p camera Logitech’s Brio range of webcams has been very popular in recent years – with the Brio Ultra HD Pro currently being our favourite 4K webcam – and it has just launched a new range of Brio cameras, starting with the Brio 500. Priced at £129.00/$129.99 and available in a variety of colours, the Brio 500 looks like a fairly conventional webcam, with a USB-C interface that allows it to work automatically with any Mac or PC that also has USB-C. However, this new model includes a number of new features that make it more versatile than many of its rivals, and will particularly appeal to people who need to make conference calls when working from home. The camera itself is fairly straightforward, with a high-quality glass lens that is capable of recording 1080p video at 30 frames per second, along with a privacy shutter and noise-cancelling microphone. The camera provides 65° – 90° field of view, but it also includes a new stand with an adjustable magnetic clip that allows you to freely rotate the camera to any angle you want. And, when used with the Logi Tune app – available for macOS 10.15 or later – you can use the new Show Mode to tilt the camera so that it points down at your desk and then automatically inverts the image so that you can show other people the documents or designs that you’re working on. 3. Razer Kiyo – Best Features on a 1080p Webcam Pros Light ring Long USB cable Good value Cons Razer's synapse app isn't Mac-compatible, but the software isn't really necessary Best Prices Today: €65.99 at amazon.de | €65.99 at coolblue | €72.90 at check24.de Elektronik Razer is best known for its range of gaming gear, and the Kiyo webcam is primarily aimed at gamers who need a high-quality camera for Twitch streaming and e-sports. It’s a shame that Razer’s Synapse app isn’t Mac-compatible, but the Kiyo itself still works as a standard USB-webcam without needing any additional software, and has a number of other useful features that will come in handy for video chats with friends and even for business calls. The Kiyo provides a nice sharp 1080p lens (1920×1080), with 81.6 degrees viewing angle, and can record video at 30fps, or capture still images at 2688×1520. The adjustable stand can clip to the top of a computer screen or fold flat to sit on your desk. You can tilt the camera lens to get just the right viewing angle, and the Kiyo’s USB cable is 1.5m long so that you can adjust the position freely. There’s also a tripod mount on the base of the stand as well – although you have to use your own tripod. Like many webcams, the Kiyo has an autofocus function so it can keep your picture nice and clear when you’re moving around, but the main feature that sets it apart is its built-in ‘lighting ring’. The andar outer rim that surrounds the camera lens lights up as soon as you select the Kiyo as a video source in your video apps, and you can turn the ring like a dial to adjust the brightness level up or down. That can help solve the gloomy image quality that many of us struggle with when making video calls from a bedroom or makeshift office at home. Razer also makes a good range of high-quality microphones that work well with the Kiyo too. 4. Logitech Brio – Best 4K webcam Pros Supports HDR Supports 1080p video at 60fps Three field-of-view options Cons High price Best Prices Today: $199.99 at Best Buy | $199.99 at Dell Home | $199.99 at Dell Small Business Logitech probably has the widest range of webcams currently available, ranging from low-cost models for video chats with your friends to gaming cameras and even full-blown videoconferencing systems for business users. The Brio is one of the company’s top-of-the-range models – in fact, Logitech claims it’s “our best webcam ever”. It’s not cheap, costing £199/$199, but earns its keep with a high-quality lens that offers full 4K resolution (4096×2160) at 30fps, or standard 1080p video (1920×1080) at 60fps (although, of course, you’ll need pretty fast broadband to handle 4K streaming). The Brio also supports HDR – high dynamic range – for bright, bold colours, and Logitech’s RightLight technology, which automatically adjusts the image to cope with changing light levels during the day. The Brio is versatile, too, offering three field-of-view settings: a narrow 65 degrees for close-up head-and-shoulders shots, or you can widen the view to 78 degrees or 90 degrees to capture a wider view of the room and other people. The camera also includes two microphones, with noise-cancellation features to improve audio quality. The adjustable stand can clip on to the top of your computer screen, or be mounted on a tripod for more professional productions (although you do have to supply your own tripod). There’s a privacy shade to cover the camera for extra security. The Brio works as a standard USB camera, so you can quickly plug it in and use it on your Mac with apps such as FaceTime or Zoom, but Logitech also provides a Mac interpretación of its Settings app, to provide extra controls. 5. Ausdom AW651 – Best for Streamers + VLoggers Pros Supports HDR Supports 2K at 30fps and 1080p at 60fps Tripod included Cons No software provided Ausdom’s AW651 – sometimes also referred to as the ‘HDR 2K’ – is an affordable option for people who want more than a standard 1080p webcam, but perhaps don’t want to spend a lot of money on an expensive 4K model. Priced at a competitive $89.99/£69.99, the AW651 provides two main options, allowing you to stream 2K video (2560 x 1440) at 30 frames per second, or 1080p (1920 x 1080) at a super-smooth 60fps. It supports HDR, with auto-focus and a viewing angle of 75-degrees, and the camera head can tilt and rotate to help you get the right angle for your video calls. The only disadvantage here is that Ausdom doesn’t provide any software for the camera at all – either for Mac or Windows. There is a button on the back of the camera that lets you adjust the frame rate, but you’ll have to rely on FaceTime, Zoom or other streaming apps to control resolution and other settings. The AW651 will work with any Mac running macOS 10.6 or above, but it uses a USB-A cable to connect to your Mac, so owners of Macs that only have USB-C will need an adaptor. However, the AW651 worked fine with our office iMac (USB-A) and with our USB-C MacBook Air with an adaptor. There’s a privacy shutter built into the camera, and the adjustable stand can sit on the desk, or be attached to your computer screen or a tripod. And, surprisingly for such an affordable camera, the AW651 even includes a small six-inch tripod as well, making it good value for streamers and vloggers who need to adjust the camera position from time to time. 6. Razer Kiyo Pro – Best for 60FPS Streaming and Broadcasting Pros 60fps recording Gorilla Glass lens and lens cover Cons Software is PC only, so Mac users miss some features Lacks the lighting ring of the cheaper model Best Prices Today: $99.99 at Microsoft Razer’s Kiyo webcam made a big impression when it was first launched a few years ago, thanks to its 1080 resolution and the built-in lighting ring that helped to improve image quality for video calls and streaming. Somewhat oddly, the Kiyo Pro no longer has that lighting ring, and it sticks with 1080p resolution, yet it’s twice as expensive, costing $199.99/£199.99 compared to $99.99/£99.99 for its predecessor (which is still on sale). That’s because the Kiyo Pro steps up to a USB 3.0 interface, which allows it to record higher frame rates of up to 60fps at 1080p resolution. The high-quality camera lens also supports HDR – although HDR is only available when recording at 30fps – and performs better in low light conditions, providing better all-round image quality and colour balanceo. The Kiyo Pro also has an adjustable stand that can sit on your desk, or be attached to a computer screen or tripod (not included). The camera cable connects to a USB-A port on your computer – so you’ll need an adaptor for Macs that only have USB-C – but it’s 1.5m long, so you can move the camera around freely in order to get it into the right position. The camera lens is coated with tough Gorilla Glass for extra durability, and there’s a lens cover included as well, to protect the webcam if you need to carry it with you when you’re travelling. Unfortunately, Razer’s Synapse software is only available for Windows PCs, so Mac users miss out on some of its more advanced features, such as the ability to adjust the field of view. However, the Kiyo Pro still works perfectly well as a straightforward plug-n-play USB camera with Macs. FaceTime and Zoom on my MacBook Air detected the Kiyo Pro automatically as soon as I plugged it in, and it provided a much sharper and more colourful image than the MacBook’s ageing 720p FaceTime camera. 7. Hypercam HD – Best Budget Webcam Pros Low cost Records in a 1080p 78-degree field of view Cons equivalente to a few Chinese-made webcams, but we didn't encounter any problems The Hypercam HD is inexpensive while offering a high-spec range of features, making it one of the best value webcams here. Its 1080p HD resolution picture quality is noticeably better than the Mac’s default 720p HD camera, and the audio is clear. The Hypercam’s glass lens has a 78-degree field of view – the same as the top-end Logitech C922. It also matches that webcam with fast 720p HD at 60Hz, and 1080p at 30fps. The Hypercam features built-in HD autofocus and light correction, and two integrated mics. It is adjustable at up to 170 degrees. Installation is simple – just plug the USB cable into your computer or docking station, and the driver automatically installs for almost immediate use. Unfortunately there’s no tripod mount option, but you can hang it off your display, or place it on a desktop. We were initially concerned that it looked eerily equivalente to a few other Chinese-made webcams – and it’s not badged as a Hyper product – but we found few faults in testing. 8. AverMedia Live Streamer Cam 513 – Best 4K webcam Pros 1080p at 60fps 94-degree field of view Cons Faint ticking noise coming from the webcam Best Prices Today: $149.99 at Best Buy | Not Available at Lenovo The AverMedia Cam 513 stands out because it offers Sony’s 8MP Exmore R CMOS image sensor for 4K at 30fps or 1080p at 60fps video capture. There’s also an impressive 94-degree field of view, which provides the user with a large canvas for cropping and zooming without noticeable loss in detail. That’s where the AverMedia CamEngine comes in. CamEngine is a vital utility and essentially required to get the most out of the Cam 513 – which doesn’t have drivers, you need to use their software. The software allows you to tweak the image using advanced features such as Snapchat-style filters and AI-powered camera cropping. Regarding those AI-related capabilities, it can crop in and track your face as you move around – good news if you move around a lot while on video calls. It’s not always flawless in performance however – we found it sometimes cropped into something that vaguely looked like a face, but you’ve also got the option of manually setting up each crop for different shots and angles. Shots can be programmed to hotkeys, allowing for extreme zooms and dramatic ultra-wide shots on-the-fly during streams and video calls. You’ll also find a privacy-focused shutter built in which will cover the webcam sensor when not in use. The adjustable stand will attach to most displays. The camera plugs into your Mac camino USB-C – the cable isn’t built-in but we don’t think that is a disadvantage (it means you can replace it with a shorter or longer USB-C cable depending on how you want to set it up.) It’s a great 4K webcam – the only real annoyance is that we could hear a faint ticking noise coming from the webcam during use. What to look for in a Mac webcam We’ve picked out five webcams worthy of recommendation above, but here’s some more general advice on what to look for. Resolution The FaceTime cameras included on all MacBook laptops and most iMac models are limited to just ‘720p’ – which generally means a resolution of 1280×720 (although the FaceTime camera on my office iMac only seems to record at 1080×720). That’s pretty basic in these days of HD and 4K video, so in recent months many people have decided to upgrade to a higher-quality webcam that supports HD resolution of 1920×1080, or even one of the latest 4K webcams. Useful features As well as providing a sharper, high-resolution video image, other useful features to look out for when buying a new webcam include autofocus, which can keep the image clear and sharp even if you need to move around a little, and brightness adjustment for when gloomier days. A wide-angle lens can be useful too, allowing you to fit more than one person into the image, or allowing business users to step back from the camera while giving a presentation or using a whiteboard. Framerates You should also check to make sure that the webcam can record smooth video with a framerate of 25 or 30 frames per second (fps). Some webcams can even record at 60fps, although that’s mainly for specialist tasks such as gaming and e-sports on Twitch. Connection standards There’s certainly plenty of choice these days, and most modern webcams will work with your Mac automatically as they just use a standard USB connection – generally USB 3.0, although USB-C is now starting to appear on some new webcams too. Once it’s plugged in, a USB webcam should then be able to work with any suitable video software on your Mac, such as FaceTime, Zoom or Skype (although it’s a shame that Apple never got around to releasing a Windows interpretación of FaceTime, as that puts it at a real disadvantage against its video-chat rivals). The webcam’s microphone will also appear as an audio input in the Sounds control letrero in System Preferences on your Mac. Apps Some manufacturers also provide their own apps with their webcams, which can help with features such as brightness and autofocus, so it’s worth checking to see if the webcam provides its own Mac app as well. Computer Accessories, Mac

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AirPods vs AirPods Pro: Which is right for your ears?

Over the last two years, Apple has gone from selling one AirPods model to four. You can currently buy three earbuds—the 2nd-gen AirPods, 3rd-gen AirPods, and 2nd-gen AirPods Pro—or the AirPods Max over-the-ear headphones. Let’s set that last aside for a moment. If you’re willing to spend $500 or more on a pair of cans, you’re making a whole different buying decision than if you want true wireless earbuds. But that still leaves three relatively analógico-seeming earbuds to choose from. So which is right for you? Features at a glance Maybe the best way to make a buying decision is to see how the three current AirPods stack up side-by-side. AirPods (2nd gen)AirPods (3rd gen)AirPods Pro (2nd gen)Price$129/£139$179/£189$249/£249Weight (earbuds)0.14 oz (4 grams)0.15 oz (4.3 grams)0.19 oz (5.3 grams)Weight (case)1.35 oz (38 grams)1.34 oz (38 grams)1.79 oz (50.8 grams)Battery Life5 hrs + 19 from case6 hrs + 24 from case6 hrs + 24 from caseWireless ChargingNoYes (MagSafe)Yes (MagSafe)Noise-cancellationNoNoYesSpatial AudioApple Music only, no head trackingMusic and compacto, with head trackingMusic and compacto, with head trackingControlsTap on earbudsForce sensor on stemForce sensor on stem, swipe on stemWater/sweat-resistantNoYes (IPX4)Yes (IPX4)Design The most obvious difference between the three models is their design. The 2nd-gen AirPods retain the design you’ve known since 2016, with long white stems and earbuds that resemble the wired earpods that used to come with iPhones, just without the wire. The new 3rd-generation AirPods have shorter stems and a more bulbous, rounded earpiece. Despite the shorter stems, they’ve very analógico in weight to the older AirPods. The charging case looks very analógico to that of the AirPods Pro–shorter and wider. The AirPods Pro take the short-stem design and adds rubberized eartips to the earbuds, to create more of a seal that blocks out noise and improves sound quality. No matter which AirPods you choose, you can only get them in glossy white. AirPods (2nd-generation) Read our review Best Prices Today: $129.00 at Apple | $129.99 at Best Buy | $149.99 at Adorama Noise cancelling This is where the AirPods Pro distinguish themselves, and is the single feature most likely to get you to choose them over the 3rd-gen AirPods. Not only do the rubberized tips help block out more outside noise, the active noise cancelling gives you a real sense of a more private listening space. While we’re at it, we should mention that only the AirPods Pro support the Conversation Boost accessibility feature. Spatial Audio and sound quality All AirPods support Dolby Atmos spatial audio in Apple Music. In fact, you can force it on for any pair of headphones. But spatial audio for compacto in the TV and other supported apps, with head tracking, is not supported on the 2nd-generation AirPods. You need the 3rd-generation or the AirPods Pro to do that. The 3rd-gen AirPods have better sound than the 2nd-gen in other ways, too. Apple has a new redesigned low-distortion driver that it says delivers better sound quality, and they support Adaptive EQ like the AirPods Pro. AirPods Pro (2nd-gen) sound significantly better than acompasado AirPods, even without active noice cancelling. The 2nd-generation version, released in September 2022, offered a big step up in sound quality over the original AirPods Pro. AirPods (3rd generation) Read our review Best Prices Today: $179.00 at Apple | $179.00 at Best Buy | $179 at Abt Features and controls You control the 2nd-gen AirPods by tapping on them, while the 3rd-gen AirPods and AirPods Pro have a little cutout radio on the stem that is sensitive to pressure. Squeeze the stem (there’s a faux “click” sensation) to play/pause, skip forward, back, or summon Siri. The AirPods Pro can also detect a swipe up or down along the stem to change volume (that’s new in the 2nd-gen model). All AirPods models support hands-free “Hey Siri” control. Both AirPods Pro and 3rd-gen AirPods are water- and sweat-resistant, and probably better suited to working out, though you wouldn’t want to dunk any of them in the pool. The 2nd-gen AirPods don’t have any water resistance. The 3rd-gen AirPods support expanded Find My support for tracking down lost earbuds and setting separation alerts. The AirPods Pro, since the release of the 2nd-gen version, also have a speaker on the charging case to play a loud tone when using Find My, and have the U1 chip so you can guided directly to them. The 3rd-gen AirPods and AirPods Pro also support Announce Notifications, which lets Siri dictate important messages and alerts as they arrive. Battery life The 2nd-gen AirPods last five hours, and you can charge roughly four times with the charging case for a total of 24 hours of listening time. The 3rd-gen AirPods and AirPods Pro extend that listening time by an hour for six hours of listening time, and with four more charges in the case, you get a total of 30 hours. With AirPods Pro, turning noise cancelling off will add about an hour of listening time. Wireless charging Apple only sells the 2nd-generation AirPods with a wired case, but you can buy a wireless charging case for $79 separately. The 3rd-gen and AirPods Pro both come with a wireless charge case that lets you charge via Lightning, any Qi wireless charger, or MagSafe. You can charge the AirPods Pro using your Apple Watch charger, too. Apple AirPods Pro (2nd generation) Best Prices Today: €290.03 at Shifter | €298.85 at büroshop24 | €299.00 at amazon.de Conclusion Each of the three AirPods models Apple offers are very different. If you don’t care about wireless charging, the 2nd-gen AirPods for $129 is a decent buy. They won’t sound quite as good or last quite as long as the 3rd-gen AirPods, but they’re a good affordable option. If wireless charging matters, definitely get the 3rd-gen AirPods, since buying the charging case with the 2nd-gen AirPods will actually cost $20 more than the 3rd-gen AirPods. The AirPods Pro were updated to a second-gen model in September 2022, and while they cost a lot more, they offer much better sound quality and unique features like active noise cancelling, adaptive transparency, and conversation boost. We think the 3rd-gen AirPods are the best buy for most. They’re technically cheaper than the 2nd-gen AirPods with a wireless charging case and come with a slew of new features. They have better battery life and sound better. Since the release of the second-generation AirPods Pro, they are clearly the cura choice in every way, but you’ll pay more than 40% more for them, typically. If noise cancelling matters to you, it’s worth the extra expense. Wireless Headphones

‘Olga’: La revolución en la distancia

Por azares del destino, la ópera prima del francés afincado en Suiza Elie Grappe llega a salas comerciales en un contexto que le da una profundidad mayor a su propuesta, ‘Olga’, mostrada por primera vez en la Semana de la Crítica del 74 Festival de Cannes, exhibida en el Festival de Karlovy Vary y elegida por Suiza para representar al país en la categoría de mejor film internacional en los 94 Premios Oscar, que ahonda en el dilema personal que vive una joven gimnasta olímpica ucraniana, obligada a establecerse en Suiza poco antes del estallido de las manifestaciones y disturbios del Euromaidán que, en febrero de 2014, provocaron la caída del gobierno prorruso de Víktor Yanukóvich.

Dado que desde el 24 de febrero, día en el que Rusia invadió el este y sur de Ucrania y comenzó así la guerra entre ambos países, la población mundial mira con otros ojos el conflicto, el lanzamiento de ‘Olga’ refleja cómo pocos años antes, la opinión pública europea no era tan unánime en su apoyo a Ucrania, aunque Grappe opta por convertir su alegato en una travesía personal en la que la realidad política es imposible que sea ajena a las decisiones de su protagonista.

Ambientada poco antes del estallido del Euromaidán, Olga es una doncel de 15 años que se prepara para competir en el campeonato europeo de gimnasia artística con la selección ucraniana. Su vida dará un vuelco cuando viva en carne propia las consecuencias del trabajo de su madre, periodista, al ser casi asesinadas por gente relacionada con el gobierno de Yanukóvich, al ser su progenitora una de las personas que cargo públicamente la corrupción que vive el país. Dado que su madre no piensa abandonar su vocación, decide proteger a su hija, enviándola a Suiza, país de donde era originario su padre.

Aunque el escenario suizo fue elegido por comodidad, dado que es donde vive Grappe, es tremendamente metafórico el lugar para desarrollar la trama. País famoso por su neutralidad y por estar aislado de las decisiones políticas de la Unión Europea, al no ser un estado miembro, representa un contraste fuerte con las aspiraciones de una joven que se debate entre el sentir individual y el colectivo. Por un lado, es una gimnasta férrea y aplicada, la cual no se deja arrastrar por sus emociones a la hora de ejecutar los diferentes ejercicios; pero, por otro lado, se muestra impotente ante el surgimiento de la revolución en su país de origen, queriendo formar parte activa de ello.

Sublime ejercicio sobre cómo, cuando está en juego la mera existencia personal, hasta un leve gesto es un acto político

Ese dilema personal puede verse de manera tremendamente frontal en la película, dada la vocación de la protagonista, lo que invita a una serie de secuencias muy física; así como en la disciplina deportiva, la cual es tanto grupal como individual, lo que muestra el fuerte contraste interior que vive la joven, interpretada magistralmente por la gimnasta profesional Anastasia Budiashkina, la cual debuta como actriz en este papel, mostrando ese obra interior que vive la joven Olga de manera excepcional y profesional, pues recuerda cómo de firme es el espíritu del atleta olímpico.

Más allá de ello, Grappe, quien firma el guion junto con la reconocida guionista Raphaëlle Desplechin (hermana de Arnaud Desplechin); hace un certero retrato de cómo reaccionó el resto de la sociedad europea ante el surgimiento del Euromaidán y la actitud pasiva con la siempre beligerante Rusia. A ello se suma cómo el compromiso con la acogida se pone en entredicho cuando se tiene al refugiado en casa y no en lugar ajeno. Grappe no duda en mostrar la xenofobia que existe dentro de la sociedad del país helvético, incluyendo a la población doncel o cómo un entrenador se muestra claramente irrespetuoso por confundir Ucrania con Rusia y vivir ajenos completamente al obra que vive la muchacha por su país.

‘Olga’ resulta un debut sublime, con un cineasta comprometido que muestra cuándo resulta pertinente mostrar un compromiso político, especialmente cuando se trata de defender la mera existencia individual. El largometraje tiene la virtud de que trasciende a la fama (pues, al fin y al cabo, no se hizo pensando en ella), lo que le confiere como una expresión artística que combina magníficamente el obra social con un relato individual de catársis personal con una protagonista formidable. Grappe ya aspira a seguir los pasos del belga Lukas Dhont o su compatriota Samuel Theis en lo referente en su capacidad de acechar y plasmar la complejidad del pensamiento juvenil.

Nota: 8

Lo mejor: La fuerza interior de su protagonista.

Lo peor: Lo mostrado antes de su final es demasiado ambiguo.